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Recommended Books

The Law by Frederic Bastiat

Author: Frederic Bastiat

About the Book

‘The Law’ is at once a logical and wonderfully concise introduction to libertarian philosophy, and a strident call for ‘small government’. Frederic Bastian’s classic, written in 1850, defines the law as “collective organization of the individual right to lawful defense.”and then shows how this same law has been perverted, “annihilating the justice that it was supposed to maintain, [aiding] the unscrupulous who wish, without risk, to exploit the liberty and property of others. Given the prevalence of governmental intervention in the developed world, Frederic Bastian’s analysis is as...

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The Road to Serfdom: Fiftieth Anniversary Edition

Author: F. A. Hayek

About the Book

A classic work in political philosophy, intellectual and cultural history, and economics, The Road to Serfdom has inspired and infuriated politicians, scholars, and general readers for half a century. Originally published in England in the spring of 1944–when Eleanor Roosevelt supported the efforts of Stalin, and Albert Einstein subscribed lock, stock, and barrel to the socialist program–The Road to Serfdom was seen as heretical for its passionate warning against the dangers of state control over the means of production. For F. A. Hayek, the collectivist idea of empowering government with increasing economic control would...

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The Scar of Race

Author: Paul M. Sniderman

About the Book

What, precisely, is the clash over race in the 1990s, and does it support the charge of a “new racism”? Here is a brilliant articulation of what has happened, of how racial issues have become entangled with politics–the process of negotiating who gets what through government action. We now have to understand and cope with a “politics of...

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Memoir on Pauperism

Author: De Alexis Tocqueville

About the Book

Immediately after completing the first volume of Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville wrote his Memoir on Pauperism. It was inspired by a visit to England two years earlier and was surely in his mind while he was writing Democracy. In the “Memoir,” Tocqueville seeks to understand why the most impoverished countries of Europe in his time have the fewest paupers, while the most opulent country, England, has the most. He finds that England’s public charity—possible because of its successful economy—has produced a pauper class: the unforeseen and unfortunate consequences of good intentions. By removing the necessity for...

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Hard Measures: How Aggressive CIA Actions After 9/11 Saved American Lives

Author: Rodriguez Jr. Jose A and Bill Harlow

About the Book

An explosive memoir about the creation and implementation of the controversial Enhanced Interrogation Techniques by the former Chief Operations Officer for the CIA’s Counterterrorism Center. While the American public is aware of the CIA’s use of highly controversial “enhanced interrogation techniques,” few know the man who, in the wake of September 11, led all U.S. counterterrorism operations and oversaw the use of those procedures—procedures that obtained vital and timely intelligence and helped safeguard the nation from future attacks. Puerto Rican–born Jose A. Rodriguez, Jr., served the United States for twenty-five years...

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Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington, and the Education of a President

Author: Ron Suskind

About the Book

AcclaimedPulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ron Suskind, authorof the New York Times bestselling The Way of the World, The OnePercent Doctrine, and The Price of Loyalty, gives anexplosive inside account of an Obama White House overwhelmed by the globalfinancial crisis—and the political and economic consequences still being felttoday. Readers of Michael Lewis’s The Big Short, John Heilemann and Mark Halperin’s GameChange, and Andrew Ross Sorkin’s Too Big toFail will be riveted by Suskind’s illuminating,in-depth investigation of the financial meltdown. Rooted in hundreds of hoursof interviews with key members of the Obama...

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Showdown at Shepherd’s Bush: The 1908 Olympic Marathon and the Three Runners Who Launched a Sporting Craze

Author: David Davis

About the Book

The epic clash of an Irish-American, Italian, and Onondaga-Canadian that jump-started the first marathon mania and heralded the modern age in sports The eyes of the world watched as three runners―dirt poor Johnny Hayes, who used to run barefoot through the streets of New York City; candymaker Dorando Pietri; and the famed Tom Longboat―converged for an epic battle at the 1908 London Olympics. The incredible finish was contested the world over when Pietri, who initially ran the wrong way upon entering the stadium at Shepherd’s Bush, finished first but was disqualified for receiving aid from officials after collapsing just shy of the...

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Marathon Crasher: The Life and Times of Merry Lepper, the First American Woman to Run a Marathon

Author: David Davis

About the Book

Marathon Crasher is David Davis’s stunning account of how Merry Lepper became the first American woman to complete a marathon At a time when television was pushing male-dominated sports coverage into living rooms across America, women were struggling just to set foot onto the playing field. Barred from officially registering for long-distance running competitions, some women ran anyway, defying the authorities and the rules. Still, no American woman had ever successfully completed sports’ ultimate endurance test: the marathon. That changed in December of 1963, when Merry Lepper became the first. Leaping out of her hiding place...

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Who Really Cares: The Surprising Truth About Compasionate Conservatism Who Gives, Who Doesn’t, and Why It Matters

Author: Arthur C. Brooks

About the Book

We all know we should give to charity, but who really does? Approximately three-quarters of Americans give their time and money to various charities, churches, and causes; the other quarter of the population does not. Why has America split into two nations: givers and non-givers? Arthur Brooks, a top scholar of economics and public policy, has spent years researching this trend, and even he was surprised by what he found. In Who Really Cares, he demonstrates conclusively that conservatives really are compassionate-far more compassionate than their liberal foes. Strong families, church attendance, earned income (as opposed to state-subsidized...

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Losing Ground: American Social Policy, 1950-1980

Author: Charles Murray

About the Book

This classic book serves as a starting point for any serious discussion of welfare reform. Losing Ground argues that the ambitious social programs of the1960s and 1970s actually made matters worse for its supposed beneficiaries, the poor and minorities. Charles Murray startled readers by recommending that we abolish welfare reform, but his position launched a debate culminating in President Clinton’s proposal “to end welfare as we know...

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